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Possible Interaction: Capsaicin and Guanethidine

supplement:

Capsaicin

Research Papers that Mention the Interaction

In the presence of atropine (1 microM), guanethidine (3 microM), SR 140,333 (0.3 microM), MEN 10,627 (1 microM), apamin (0.3 microM) and L-NOARG (100 microM), the application of 1 microM capsaicin produced a transient relaxation of the strips.
Regulatory Peptides  •  1996  |  View Paper
Capsaicin (0.33-33 microM) or resiniferatoxin (0.16-1.6 microM) applied topically to the serosal surface of the stomach or jejunum produced a pronounced and long-lasting increase in blood flow after vagotomy and guanethidine treatment.
European journal of pharmacology  •  1996  |  View Paper
The inhibition of gastric motility caused by capsaicin (33 and 330 microM) was only partially reduced by guanethidine pretreatment.
Neuroscience  •  1992  |  View Paper
Ruthenium red (3-5 microM) antagonism of the inhibitory effect of capsaicin (1 microM) on the contractile response to mesenteric nerve stimulation in the presence of hexamethonium (50 microM) and guanethidine (2 microM) was reversed significantly by sialic acid (2 mM) or neuraminidase (0.1 U/ml).
European journal of pharmacology  •  1992  |  View Paper
Capsaicin induced a marked increase in blood flow both in the bronchial and superior laryngeal arteries after pre-treatment with atropine, guanethidine and chlorisondamine.
Acta physiologica Scandinavica  •  1989  |  View Paper
Accumulations of the mitochondrial enzyme activities, glutaminase, hexokinase, and glutamic dehydrogenase, were reduced about % each by capsaicin and guanethidine pretreatment.
The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience  •  1983  |  View Paper