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Last Updated: 3 months ago

Possible Interaction: Bombesin and Glucose

supplement:

Glucose

Research Papers that Mention the Interaction

Neostigmine (cholinesterase inhibitor) or bombesin , when injected into the third cerebral ventricle of awake rat, dose-dependently increased serum glucose with the simultaneous rise in hypothalamic noradrenergic neuronal activity (NAA).
Brain Research  •  2001  |  View Paper
In vivo experiment, it was found that preinjection of bombesin (50 micrograms/kg, sublingual v.) could effectively prevent an increase of plasma glucose and decrease of plasma insulin in diabetic rat induced by alloxan (200 mg/kg, s.c.) (2).
Sheng li xue bao : [Acta physiologica Sinica]  •  1991  |  View Paper
Bombesin (10(-9) mol) injected into the third cerebral ventricle produced an increase in plasma concentrations of glucose , glucagon, and epinephrine.
Endocrinologia japonica  •  1988  |  View Paper
When administered with glucose (2 g/kg ip), bombesin (1 mg/kg ip) rapidly increased insulin concentrations of lean and ob/ob mice (maximum increases of 39 and 63% respectively at 5 min).
Comparative biochemistry and physiology. B, Comparative biochemistry  •  1987  |  View Paper
Bombesin acts within dog brain to increase plasma concentrations of glucose and epinephrine.
Brain Research  •  1983  |  View Paper
Administration of bombesin into the lateral ventricle of awake, unrestrained animals results in elevation of plasma glucose , preceded by a significant increase in plasma epinephrine and no increase in plasma norepinephrine or dopamine.
Endocrinology  •  1979  |  View Paper
The total glucose appearing in urine following a glucose load was sharply reduced by bombesin.
British journal of pharmacology  •  1973  |  View Paper