Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence
supp.ai logo
supp.ai

Discover Supplement-Drug Interactions

Disclaimer: The information contained herein should NOT be used as a substitute for the advice of an appropriately qualified and licensed physician or other health care provider. The tool is not a substitute for the care provided… (more)
Last Updated: 4 months ago

Possible Interaction: Acetylcysteine and Charcoal

supplement:

Acetylcysteine

Research Papers that Mention the Interaction

When salicylic acid was added to simulate a coingestant, N-acetylcysteine significantly decreased salicylate adsorption by charcoal (p<0.001).
When salicylic acid was added to simulate a coingestant, N-acetylcysteine significantly decreased salicylate adsorption by charcoal (p<0.001).
Pharmacotherapy  •  2001  |  View Paper
In addition, the role of multiple dose activated charcoal and the controversial issue of the N-acetylcysteine and activated charcoal interaction are discussed.
Emergency medicine clinics of North America  •  1994  |  View Paper
This conflicts with previously published in vitro data; therefore, it is recommended that activated charcoal should not be administered concomitantly with acetylcysteine as a usual procedure until more data are available.
American journal of hospital pharmacy  •  1981  |  View Paper
Acetylcysteine's pharmacokinetics, quantitation of plasma concentrations, and the lack of an identifiable pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship all contribute to the difficulties in determining whether activated charcoal inhibits the oral absorption of acetylcysteine , or alters acetylcysteine's efficacy in treating acetaminophen overdoses.
  •  1991  |  View Paper
Results indicate that activated charcoal effectively adsorbs both methionine and N-acetylcysteine.
Since these agents must be absorbed from the GI tract to prevent acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, concurrent administration of methionine or N-acetylcysteine and activated charcoal would be expected to markedly diminish their antidotal effectiveness.
Clinical toxicology  •  1981  |  View Paper